Forest fragmentation impacts the seasonality of Amazonian evergreen canopies - HAL-SDE - Sciences de l'environnement Access content directly
Journal Articles Nature Communications Year : 2022

Forest fragmentation impacts the seasonality of Amazonian evergreen canopies

Abstract

Predictions of the magnitude and timing of leaf phenology in Amazonian forests remain highly controversial. Here, we use terrestrial LiDAR surveys every two weeks spanning wet and dry seasons in Central Amazonia to show that plant phenology varies strongly across vertical strata in old-growth forests, but is sensitive to disturbances arising from forest fragmentation. In combination with continuous microclimate measurements, we find that when maximum daily temperatures reached 35 °C in the latter part of the dry season, the upper canopy of large trees in undisturbed forests lost plant material. In contrast, the understory greened up with increased light availability driven by the upper canopy loss, alongside increases in solar radiation, even during periods of drier soil and atmospheric conditions. However, persistently high temperatures in forest edges exacerbated the upper canopy losses of large trees throughout the dry season, whereas the understory in these light-rich environments was less dependent on the altered upper canopy structure. Our findings reveal a strong influence of edge effects on phenological controls in wet forests of Central Amazonia.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
Nunes_etal_Nature_Comm_2022_13_1.pdf (1.66 Mo) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Publisher files allowed on an open archive

Dates and versions

hal-03582348 , version 1 (21-02-2022)

Licence

Attribution

Identifiers

Cite

Matheus Henrique Nunes, José Luís Campana Camargo, Grégoire Vincent, Kim Calders, Rafael S. Oliveira, et al.. Forest fragmentation impacts the seasonality of Amazonian evergreen canopies. Nature Communications, 2022, 13 (1), pp.917. ⟨10.1038/s41467-022-28490-7⟩. ⟨hal-03582348⟩
730 View
73 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More